Short Term Trading vs Fundamental Investing

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Midas Letter is provided as a source of information only, and is in no way to be construed as investment advice. James West, the author and publisher of the Midas Letter, is not authorized to provide investor advice, and provides this information only to readers who are interested in knowing what he is investing in and how he reaches such decisions.

Investing in emerging public companies involves a high degree of risk and investors in such companies could lose all their money. Always consult a duly accredited investment professional in your jurisdiction prior to making any investment decision.

Midas Letter occasionally accepts fees for advertising and sponsorship from public companies featured on this site. James West and/or Midas Letter may also receive compensation from companies affiliated with companies featured on this site. James West and/or Midas Letter also invests in companies on this site and so readers should view all information on this site as biased.

There are many styles of investing in which people can make money. But, the debate over which investing method is best is a highly disputed one.

Those strategies tend to exist within 2 categories: there are the fundamental investors; whose philosophies are based on the underlying intrinsic value of a particular company and sector (Warren Buffett perhaps being the most famous). Then there are the technical traders; whose methods are based on the price action and the volume of trades within a particular stock.

Most traders fall somewhat on a sliding scale between those two differing ways of thinking. Both have its advantages and if stuck to only one approach, an investor could perhaps miss out on opportunities.

For example, technical charts can be used to determine supply and demand patterns that have already occurred based on momentum and trends but cannot be used to determine whether a stock is over or undervalued and what its value may be years into the future.

Watch the full interview to see what methods of thinking our panel of expertise use to profit in the short and long term.

Midas Letter is provided as a source of information only, and is in no way to be construed as investment advice. James West, the author and publisher of the Midas Letter, is not authorized to provide investor advice, and provides this information only to readers who are interested in knowing what he is investing in and how he reaches such decisions.

Investing in emerging public companies involves a high degree of risk and investors in such companies could lose all their money. Always consult a duly accredited investment professional in your jurisdiction prior to making any investment decision.

Midas Letter occasionally accepts fees for advertising and sponsorship from public companies featured on this site. James West and/or Midas Letter may also receive compensation from companies affiliated with companies featured on this site. James West and/or Midas Letter also invests in companies on this site and so readers should view all information on this site as biased.